Monday, December 11, 2017

Gene Knockdown in Disease Involving Gene Expression Throughout Brain Reported

Today, Ionis issued a press release revelaing that their drug candidate for Huntington’s Disease was able to knock down the huntingtin target gene in a dose-dependent manner.  This is the first clinical demonstration that single-stranded phosphorothioate antisense technology cannot only engage gene targets, as had been shown in the gain-of-function approach for spinal muscular atrophy (SPINRAZA; slide 58), but that it could do so in a sufficiently robust manner so that a knockdown could be measured.

This, of course, has broad implications for the Ionis antisense platform which is similarly being developed for other RNaseH-based knockdown applications ranging from the rare and severe (e.g. ALS, spinal cerebellar ataxias) to the more common neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s.

The reason why this feat is remarkable and a great de-risking event for the technology is that in some of the indications, the target gene is expressed and needs to be suppressed more or less throughout the brain.  Assuming Ionis didn’t take brain biopsies, but instead looked for protein expression by taking CSF samples which would +/- give you an average of target gene expression in the entire CNS (a safe assumption), the ability to assess a dose-dependent gene knockdown is a testament to the robustness of the gene knockdown.

The actual numbers, however, remain under wraps as Ionis and partner Roche (which has exercised its option to IONS-HTTRx in the wake of the data) plan to present them more formally through a publication and a conference presentation with key thought leaders in the disease present.  My guess is that peak knockdown is in the 50%+ range which Frank Bennett from Ionis has recently referred to be in the desired knockdown range.

Given that dosing in the study only lasted 3 months in this slowly progressive disease, it is unlikely that actual clinical benefits will be reported from this phase I/IIa study.  But given the so called 'huntingtin knockdown holiday phenomenon' and some remarkable comments from investigators in the study and KOLs, one cannot but hope that we’ll be in for a positive surprise.  

By Dirk Haussecker. All rights reserved.

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